Ergonomics

Ergonomics

Ergonmic checklists - Work Method

Physical Demands
  • Does the task involve a heavy muscular load; if so, does this limit selection of worker?
  • Does the work involve overloading small muscle groups?
  • Can the workload be transferred by method change to larger muscle groups thus reducing fatigue?
  • To what extent can muscular effort be reduced by using suitable equipment?
  • To what extent are heavy loads snatched or carried awkwardly?
  • Are small or large muscle groups involved in static exertion by holding tools or material; can jigs be used?
  • Is alternation of work and rest, and of static and dynamic work built into the work method?
  • Is the pattern of movement in agreement with the principles of motion economy?
  • Does the task require great accuracy of movement; is there an absence of feedback?
Mental Demands
  • Is there the recommended compatible relation between direction of movement of control and the resultant effect?
  • Can the controls be recognized easily by shape, size, labeling, color, for both normal use and in emergency?
  • Are the controls as near as possible to the corresponding sources of information?
  • Are the positions of controls in the right sequence for the performance of the task?
  • Do workers receive sufficient information regarding the process flow and output?
  • Have data to be processed before required action can be taken?
  • Have different data to be compared before action can be taken?
  • Are any data to be estimated?
  • Are standards of comparison available and used?
  • Are parts to be assembled, supplied correctly pre-orientated?
  • Can signals be confused?
  • Do signals always have the same level of significance?
  • Is the task adapted to the capacities of older workers; considering thought, sight, hearing, touch and movement as separate processes?
  • Are there adequate rest pauses during the monitoring work; to what extent can rest be taken during the task?
Flow of Information
  • Are the data required to carry out the task obvious, unequivocal, and relevant?
  • Is every part of these data necessary for performance; are differing and appropriate amounts of data available during the learning process?
  • Is the rate of information likely to exceed the mental capacity of the operator and to overload him or her before the end of the task?
  • Can the relative advantages of seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, etc. be used to advantage in spreading the information load more evenly?
  • Is the rate of information likely to underload the operator?
  • How are signals to be detected when the worker's mind is occupied by monitoring actions?
  • Do the various displays of different information vary in more than one aspect? To what extent can they be distinguished from each other simply and in emergency?
  • How much information has to be retained for longer than three seconds; to what extent is it reinforced by retrieval?
  • Is the attention span longer than about 20 minutes if a signal can occur at any time; but does it occur less than about four times per half-hour?
  • Can signals from different sources occur simultaneously or almost simultaneously; is this more likely to happen in an emergency when the consequences of misinterpretation could be catastrophic?
  • Can preferred signals be easily distinguished?
  • Do identical or very similar signals occur for a long time and are they frequently repeated?
  • To what extent does the worker have to make one or more choices in response to a signal, and how soon does he or she know if the choice is wrong?
  • Are all the factors relevant to a decision presented at the right time and sequence?
  • Is adequate time allowed for decisions and resulting actions, not only in the normal circumstance but more importantly in the emergency?
  • To what extent does rapid feedback give the results of system adjustment; to what extent is there a knock-on effect?

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