Business Communications Skills

Interpersonal Communication Skills

Huddling

This is an informal management communication technique and is the the title of an unusual book (referenced in the PDF) dealing entirely with business communications. The Concise Oxford Dictionary defines 'huddle' colloquially as a close or secret conference.

This book demonstrates that results are not produced by organizations but by people, by a special kind of people - the 'huddlers', who are able to work intimately and informally in small groups. It is one of the most effective means of communication.

To be effective, a manager needs to be a 'huddler'. Normal communications within an organization are in the form of inter-office memoranda and or e-mail, with copies to all and sundry. If it deals with matters which are confidential, and is so marked, then it is read by everyone including the office helpers, even before the message reaches the target person. So much for confidentiality.

Further, the recipient, already flooded with a paper explosion, hardly has the time to read it, let alone act on it. The same message conveyed verbally face-to-face will not only remain confidential but will be extremely effective.

Clarification, if any, is sought and given immediately, and in addition instant feedback ensures that there is complete understanding of the message and the resulting action required. Plus, of course, there is the 'human touch' element, completely lacking in the memorandum.

Huddling, of course, is nothing new. It has always been there in the matter of inter-personal relations. The book attempts to formalize an informal means of communication. There is, too, sufficient demonstration in the book, as from our personal experience, about the effectiveness and result-achieving ability of the technique.

A few minutes of informal conversation with subordinates, peers and superiors, along the corridors of the office or in the wash rooms can be most effective. The practice of this technique therefore needs to be encouraged.

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